+ inload: Crusader and Servitor +

+ Combat Arena Completed +


+ The Crusader and Servitor below are the last two figures from the Combat Arena boxed set, and that means – for the first time in my life – I've painted a boxed game ready to play. +

+ Seems weird – I've painted lots of miniatures, but never a whole set: some figures from every set have either been cannibalised, repurposed, or left unpainted. It's a nice feeling to have a game all ready! +


+ Gotfret de Montbard, Crusader +

+ A characteristically stoical pose, I'm slightly disappointed that GW essentially redid the previous metal iteration of this character type rather than trying something a bit more dynamic. That said, I don't have any of the metal ones, so no great loss. +


+ For the paint scheme, I knew I wanted to keep things nearly completely red in order to suggest Emperor Palpatine's Guard from Star Wars. I think these sinister figures have a lot in common with Inquisitorial Crusaders, and the all-red scheme is very striking. +

+ The shield's an obvious exception – and intentionally so. The helmed head doesn't make a great focal point, so I've made that secondary. Gofret de Montbard is a bodyguard, an anonymous figure; and so his mistress' heraldry – displayed on the shield – is paramount. Nevertheless, I've used a warm, red-tinged yellow for the shield in order to keep things harmonious. +


+ To avoid having all the elements blurring together, I used cool reds for the capes and warm red for the armour. This standalone figure was thus a useful bit of practise for both Blood Angels and Word Bearers. Lone characters are useful for this – had something gone awry, I'd only have to adjust this one figure. +


+ Note the orange eye lens, red purity seals and warm-brown leather – again, all adding to the warm scheme. +



+ The chequerboard effect (or 'dicing', as I recently found out it's referred to) was originally subtler. I used a mid-brown rather than cream. It had a nice effect, but I felt the shield needed more punch to work heraldically. The result is a bit scrappier than I would have liked, so perhaps I'll return to re-work it. Note the lens on the shield is painted in the same way as the eye. The legend on the shield-scroll reads Vici – 'I conquered'. +


+ Combat Servitor X-101 +

+ As mentioned in an earlier inload [+noosphericinloadlinkembedded+], I used a very workmanlike scheme for this fantastic figure, intending this brainless man-machine to appear like a JCB or similar piece of heavy equipment. +

+ Besides the techpriest, this figure is probably my favourite in the set. Clunky, ungainly and asymmetrical, it looks lumbering and threatening – in a brainless zombie sort of way. +



+ The scheme hopefully has echoes of the power-lifter from Aliens, a similar piece of industrial tech that fits neatly into the 40k universe. Like the power loader, it's got a pair of big claws, some pitted metal and a load of lights and dials. +

+ I've used a piercing green for the bionic eye – the other one is rolled back to suggest this poor soul's mindless nature. +



+ The big claw is the only bit of metal that gets the yellow scheme – all the rest is less bare. To show the rigid texture, I've added some light damage – and avoided doing so on the workmanlike 'overalls'. You can add scratches and so forth on those (to an extent, that's how I did the leather coat on the psyker in the inload linked above), but if you're trying to distinguish two similarly-coloured but differently-textured areas on one figure, I find it best to avoid confusing matters. +



+ One thing I've noticed about all these Combat Arena models is that they've got great details on their backs. The dials and switches here, the dangling charms on the Crusader... I'm not sure if it's intentional, but it'll likely look nice during the game, where you're probably looking at the rear of your character for most of it. Nice touch! +



+ As with the dials, I added some red warning lights, but kept the searchlight dim – by painting it as switched off, I didn't have to do any object source lighting, and kept the focus on the face. Note the little barcode on the shoulder, and the yellow banding on the cable around its stomach. Little details like this add some freehand personalisation for very little effort. +


+++



+ ...and so, with the addition of a drybrush and few tufts of static flock, that completes the motley crew for Combat Arena. They look nice together – so hopefully they look equally good beating the [SCRAPSHUNTERRORABORT] out of each other, too. I'm looking forward to playing a fully-painted game. +

+ Which one's your favourite? +

6 comments:

  1. Love the result of all this - I'd have to say my favourite is the Psyker. Something about muted colour schemes just really appeals to me. I've actually been thinking about picking up some of the traitor guard or cultist models from BSF, now that they come in their own boxes, but I haven't decided which to get just yet.

    Also, I'm not sure if this is on my end or part of your photography setup, but the lighting in the last photo seems a little bit more red than your last few posts. Was that intentional? Am I just imagining it?

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    Replies
    1. Cheers Sunfire. You and I are like of mind – both when it comes to colour scheme approach, and also the appeal of the Blackstone Fortress baddies. I personally prefer the traitor guardsman to the cultists, but I think both sets have their appeal.

      As regards the lighting on the photographic setup, yes, it does look redder. At this time of year I'm usually out of the house when there's enough daylight (my preferred light source), so I end up having to use my painting rig, which has a daylight bulb.

      Things are a bit cramped, so that tends to wash things out or give very strong contrasts. As a rule, I don't adjust my photographs, so I tend to just re-take 'em until I get a shot I'm happy with. Sometimes, though, I'm just in too much of a rush! :D

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    2. Yeah, I have the same no-adjustment policy. Too much of a hassle for the likes of us, better to spend the time painting. I have a dedicated booth-thing set up in a shelf behind my desk, and I recently swapped to proper neutral white bulbs after using warm white for a while. Had to change quite a few of my camera settings, and the result seems a bit more toyish in some way, like it's easier to tell the models are not actually "real". But it did fix the issues I was having with dark shadows, so it's a real trade-off.

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  2. If I have to pick a favourite it has to be the servitor!..

    That said their all brilliant!

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  3. Amazing. The crusader pose is too static, as you point out, but the work you did on the different tones of red is simply awesome. The servitor is quite an inspiring mini, but it's your paintjob what brings him to life. Congratulations!

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